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Career Readiness

Career Readiness is the attainment and demonstration of competencies that broadly prepare students for a successful transition into the workplace. These competencies include communication, professionalism, teamwork and collaboration, and career management.

Students can view Career Readiness events and programs on Engage that are provided by the Division.

Communication

Communication is writing and speaking effectively within multiple contexts1 and environments2 while leveraging strong verbal, non-verbal, and listening skills.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will accurately and coherently explain a topic, idea, or feeling.
  • Students will identify active listening skills.
  • Students will listen actively and attentively.
  • Students will listen and respond to constructive feedback professionally, without deflection, and ask for clarification as needed.
  • Students will consider the interests and perspectives of others when communicating interpersonally.
  • Students will identify strategies to mediate and resolve conflicts.
  • Students will increase their self-efficacy to mediate and resolve conflicts.
  • Students will demonstrate successful strategies to mediate and resolve conflicts.

1 Contexts refers to the circumstances that form and surround the reason of the communication
(e.g. customer service, interpersonal relationships, interviewing, networking).
2 Environments refers to the surroundings or medium in which the communication occurs
(e.g. in-person, email, phone, video conferencing).

References and Grounding Documents
Critical Thinking

A habit of mind that exercises "logical interpretation, analysis, and evaluation" (Facione, 1990, p. 8) of evidence, situations, and theories to engage with individual and community problem solving and decision making.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will identify the process and skills needed to successfully think critically.
  • Students will increase their self-efficacy to think critically.
  • Students will clearly explain the issue and relevant evidence, situations, and ideas.
  • Students will analyze the significance of relevant evidence, situations, and ideas.
  • Students will analyze the influence of their own and others' assumptions.
  • Students will express a logical conclusion.
References and Grounding Documents
Intercultural Knowledge and Competence

"Intercultural Knowledge and Competence is a set of cultural, affective, and behavioral skills and characteristics that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts" (AAC&U, 2009a, p. 1).

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will increase awareness of how their own identities and cultural perspectives1 influence their interactions in their local and global communities.
  • Students will increase their curiosity about and openness to other identities and cultural perspectives and people.
  • Students will increase their self-efficacy and ability to positively engage2 perspectives and experiences different from ones own.
  • Students will increase their knowledge of and empathy for other identities and cultural perspectives.
  • Students will increase their ability to communicate verbally and nonverbally across cultural differences in culturally considerate ways.

1 Culture is the knowledge, beliefs, values, and traditions, and experiences shared by a group.
2 Positive engagement is the process of interacting with others while treating their cultures as different
rather than inferior, or deficit (difference-based v. deficit-based perspective). This process requires a desire to learn,
strong interpersonal communication, reflection, willingness to receive feedback, and humility.

References and Grounding Documents
Leadership Development

Continuously expanding an individuals capacity to engage in the process of leadership1, which includes leadership capacity2, leadership efficacy3, leadership motivation4, and leadership enactment5.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will increase their knowledge of leadership perspectives and concepts for effectively engaging in leadership.
  • Students will increase their knowledge of skills required for effectively engaging in leadership.
  • Students will increase self-efficacy to engage in leadership within multiple contexts and roles.
  • Students will increase their desire to engage in leadership.
  • Students will increase the intensity of their effort when engaging in leadership.
  • Students will increase their persistence to engage in leadership.
  • Students will improve their effective engagement in leadership.

1 Beyond identifying leadership as a process, there are many widely used and accepted definitions
of leadership (Stogdill, 1974). However, in leadership education, it is a common exercise to engage students
in the process of illuminating ones personal definition or philosophy rather than defining it for them.
2 Leadership capacity is an individuals knowledge and skills for effectively engaging in leadership (Day et al., 2009).
3 Leadership efficacy is an individuals belief about their abilities to engage in leadership within multiple contexts and roles (Dugan, 2017; Hannah et al., 2008).
4 Leadership motivation is an individuals desire, intensity of effort, and persistence to engage in leadership (Chan & Drasgow, 2001).
5 Leadership enactment is an individuals effective engagement in leadership (Dugan, 2017).

References and Grounding Documents
  • Chan, K. Y., & Drasgow, F. (2001). Toward a theory of individual differences and leadership: understanding the motivation to lead. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86(3), 481. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.86.3.481
  • Day, D. V., Harrison, M. M., & Halpin, S. M. (2009). An integrative approach to leader development: Connecting adult development, identity and expertise. Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group.
  • Dugan, J. P. (2017). Leadership theory: Cultivating critical perspectives. Jossey-Bass.
  • Hannah, S. T., Avolio, B. J., Luthans, F., & Harms, P. D. (2008). Leadership efficacy: Review and future directions. The Leadership Quarterly, 19(6), 669-692. doi: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2008.09.007
  • Roberts, D. C. (1981). Student leadership programs in higher education. Carbondale, IL: ACPA Southern Illinois University Press.
  • Stogdill, R. M. (1974). Handbook of leadership: A survey of theory and research. The Free Press.
Problem Solving

A cognitive process of designing, evaluating, and implementing a strategy to navigate a challenge and achieve a goal through the application of skills1, knowledge of a situation or environment, and critical and reflective thinking.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will identify the process and skills needed to successfully solve problems.
  • Students will increase their self-efficacy to successfully solve problems.
  • Students will define the problem and set priorities to solve the problem.
  • Students will design and evaluate multiple strategies to solve the problem, while considering the situation and environment.
  • Students will implement the chosen strategy in a manner that addresses the multiple contextual factors of the problem.
  • Students will reflect upon the outcomes and identify areas of need for further work.

1 Identify the problem and set priorities, determine relevant information and deepen understanding,
enumerate the options and anticipate consequences [sic], assess the situation and make a preliminary decision,
scrutinize the process and self-correct as needed (Facione, 2015, p. 27).

References and Grounding Documents
Professionalism

Professionalism is completing the responsibilities assigned, assuming additional responsibilities as able and needed, positively engaging in teamwork1, and adhering to organizational policies, procedures, and culture.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will articulate how the quality of their work impacts the success of achieving organizational goals.
  • Students will complete the tasks for which they are responsible by the deadline and with high quality.
  • Students will think it is important to publicly maintain a positive attitude about the organization.
  • Students will publicly maintain a positive attitude about the organization and provide constructive feedback in appropriate contexts.
  • Students will increase their self-efficacy and ability to publicly support the team’s decisions, even when the decision differs from their personal opinion.
  • Students will learn strategies to identify organizational policies, procedures, and culture.
  • Students will think that it is important to adhere to organizational policies, procedures, and culture.
  • Students will adhere to organizational policies, procedures, and culture.

1 Teamwork is another learning construct within Career Readiness. Please review the definition and learning outcomes of Teamwork and Collaboration to learn more.

References and Grounding Documents
Teamwork & Collaboration

Teamwork is an effective group dynamic1 where high-functioning, professional2, intentionally organized groups are engaged through well-defined roles allowing for equitable contributions towards a common purpose and goals.

Collaboration is the “process of joint decision making” (Gray, 1991) across different organizations’ teams and committing to shared “ownership of decisions and collective responsibility of outcomes'' (Liedtka & Whitten, 1998).

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will articulate the difference between group work, teamwork, and collaboration.
  • Students will articulate how their behaviors impact a constructive team climate.
  • Students will think that it is important to support the wellbeing and success of organization members.
  • Students will demonstrate behaviors that support the wellbeing and success of organization members and contribute to a constructive team climate.
  • Students will engage in and support the facilitation of team dialogue and decision-making toward achieving team goals.
  • Students will contribute to succession planning for their role and the team.
  • Students will increase the value they place on collaboration to achieve team goals and purpose.
  • Students will seek out and engage in collaboration.

1 Effective group dynamic requires individual participation and commitment; group cohesion; effective communication; and goal achievement orientation.
2 Professionalism is another learning construct within Career Readiness. Please review the definition and learning outcomes of Professionalism to learn more.

References and Grounding Documents
Career Management

The definition and learning outcomes for Career Management are currently being developed by the Division's Career Readiness Assessment Fellows.